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Producers Spotlight : In the Lab with Dr. Dre

Posted on: November 21, 2018, by :

DR. DRE – Iconic Hip Hop producer **


Andre Romelle Young[2]:1 (born February 18, 1965),[3] better known by his stage name Dr. Dre, is an American record producer, rapper and entrepreneur. He is the founder and CEO of Aftermath Entertainment and Beats Electronics, and was previously co-owner of Death Row Records. He has produced albums for and overseen the careers of many rappers, including 2PacThe D.O.C.Snoop DoggEminemXzibitKnoc-turn’al50 CentThe Game, and Kendrick Lamar. He is credited as a key figure in the crafting and popularization of West Coast G-funk, a rap style characterized as synthesizer-based with slow, heavy beats. As of 2018, he is the third richest figure in hip hop, with a net worth of $770 million.[4]

Dre began his career as a member of the World Class Wreckin’ Cru. He found fame with the influential gangsta rap group N.W.A with Eazy-EIce CubeMC Ren, and DJ Yella, which popularized explicit lyrics in rap to detail the violence of street life. His 1992 solo debut The Chronic, released under Death Row Records, made him one of the best-selling American performing artists of 1993, and earned him a Grammy Awardfor the single “Let Me Ride“. That year, he produced Death Row labelmate Snoop Dogg’s quadruple platinum debut Doggystyle, and mentored producers such as his step-brother Warren G (leading to the multi-platinum debut Regulate…G Funk Era in 1994) and Snoop Dogg’s cousin Daz Dillinger (leading to the double-platinum debut Dogg Food by Tha Dogg Pound in 1995).

In 1996, Dr. Dre left Death Row Records to establish his own label, Aftermath Entertainment. He produced a compilation album, Dr. Dre Presents the Aftermath, in 1996, and released a solo album, 2001, in 1999. During the 2000s, Dr. Dre focused on producing other artists, occasionally contributing vocals. Dr. Dre signed Eminem in 1998 and 50 Cent in 2002, and co-produced their albums. He has won six Grammy Awards, including Producer of the Year. Dr. Dre has had acting roles in movies such as Set It OffThe Wash and Training DayRolling Stone ranked Dre 56 on their list of “100 Greatest Artists of All Time”.


Check out this video : In The LAB with Dr. Dre

1996–1998: Move to Aftermath Entertainment

The Dr. Dre Presents the Aftermath album, released on November 26, 1996, featured songs by Dr. Dre himself, as well as by newly signed Aftermath Entertainment artists, and a solo track “Been There, Done That“, intended as a symbolic farewell to gangsta rap.[23] Despite being classified platinum by the RIAA,[14] the album was not very popular among music fans.[10] In October 1996, Dre performed “Been There, Done That” on Saturday Night Live.[24] In 1997, Dr. Dre produced several tracks on The Firm‘s The Album; it was met with largely negative reviews from critics. Rumors began to abound that Aftermath was facing financial difficulties.[25] Aftermath Entertainment also faced a trademark infringement lawsuit by the underground thrash metal band Aftermath.[26] First Round Knock Out, a compilation of various tracks produced and performed by Dr. Dre, was also released in 1996, with material ranging from World Class Wreckin’ Cru to N.W.A to Death Row recordings.[27] Dr. Dre chose to take no part in the ongoing East Coast–West Coast hip hop rivalry of the time, instead producing for, and appearing on, several New York artists’ releases, such as Nas‘ “Nas Is Coming”, LL Cool J‘s “Zoom” and Jay-Z‘s “Watch Me”.

The turning point for Aftermath came in 1998, when Jimmy Iovine, the head of Aftermath’s parent label Interscope, suggested that Dr. Dre sign Eminem, a white rapper from Detroit. Dre produced three songs and provided vocals for two on Eminem’s successful and controversial debut album The Slim Shady LP, released in 1999.[28] The Dr. Dre-produced lead single from that album, “My Name Is“, brought Eminem to public attention for the first time, and the success of The Slim Shady LP – it reached number two on the Billboard 200 and received general acclaim from critics – revived the label’s commercial ambitions and viability.[28][29][30]

 

After the Aftermath : 

2001–2007: Focus on production and Detox

Logo used by 2001-era Dr. Dre

Following the success of 2001, Dr. Dre focused on producing songs and albums for other artists. He co-produced six tracks on Eminem’s landmark Marshall Mathers LP, including the Grammy-winning lead single, “The Real Slim Shady“. The album itself earned a Grammy and proved to be the fastest-selling rap album of all time, moving 1.76 million units in its first week alone.[41] He produced the single “Family Affair” by R&B singer Mary J. Blige for her album No More Drama in 2001.[42] He also produced “Let Me Blow Ya Mind“, a duet by rapper Eve and No Doubt lead singer Gwen Stefani[43] and signed R&B singer Truth Hurts to Aftermath in 2001.[44] Dr. Dre was the executive producer of Eminem’s 2002 release, The Eminem Show. He produced three songs on the album, one of which was released as a single, and he appeared in the award-winning video for “Without Me“. He also produced The D.O.C.‘s 2003 album Deuce, where he made a guest appearance on the tracks “Psychic Pymp Hotline”, “Gorilla Pympin'” and “Judgment Day”.

Another copyright-related lawsuit hit Dr. Dre in the fall of 2002, when Sa Re Ga Ma, a film and music company based in Calcutta, India, sued Aftermath Entertainment over an uncredited sample of the Lata Mangeshkar song “Thoda Resham Lagta Hai” on the Aftermath-produced song “Addictive” by singer Truth Hurts. In February 2003, a judge ruled that Aftermath would have to halt sales of Truth Hurts’ album Truthfully Speaking if the company would not credit Mangeshkar.[45]

Another successful album on the Aftermath label was Get Rich or Die Tryin’, the 2003 major-label debut album by Queens, New York-based rapper 50 Cent. Dr. Dre produced or co-produced four tracks on the album, including the hit single “In da Club“, a joint production between Aftermath, Eminem’s boutique label Shady Records and Interscope.[46] Eminem’s fourth album since joining Aftermath, Encore, again saw Dre taking on the role of executive producer, and this time he was more actively involved in the music, producing or co-producing a total of eight tracks, including three singles. In November 2004, at the Vibe magazine awards show in Los Angeles, Dr. Dre was attacked by a fan named Jimmy James Johnson, who was supposedly asking for an autograph. In the resulting scuffle, then-G-Unit rapper Young Buck stabbed the man.[47] Johnson claimed that Suge Knight, president of Death Row Records, paid him $5,000 to assault Dre in order to humiliate him before he received his Lifetime Achievement Award.[48] Knight immediately went on CBS‘s The Late Late Show to deny involvement and insisted that he supported Dr. Dre and wanted Johnson charged.[49] In September 2005, Johnson was sentenced to a year in prison and ordered to stay away from Dr. Dre until 2008.[50]

Dr. Dre also produced “How We Do“, a 2005 hit single from rapper The Game from his album The Documentary,[51] as well as tracks on 50 Cent’s successful second album The Massacre. For an issue of Rolling Stone magazine in April 2005, Dr. Dre was ranked 54th out of 100 artists for Rolling Stone magazine’s list “The Immortals: The Greatest Artists of All Time”. Kanye West wrote the summary for Dr. Dre, where he stated Dr. Dre’s song “Xxplosive” as where he “got (his) whole sound from”.[52]

In November 2006, Dr. Dre began working with Raekwon on his album Only Built 4 Cuban Linx II.[53] He also produced tracks for the rap albums Buck the World by Young Buck,[54] Curtis by 50 Cent,[55] Tha Blue Carpet Treatment by Snoop Dogg,[56] and Kingdom Come by Jay-Z.[57] Dre also appeared on Timbaland‘s track “Bounce”, from his 2007 solo album, Timbaland Presents Shock Value alongside, Missy Elliott, and Justin Timberlake.[58] During this period, The D.O.C. stated that Dre had been working with him on his fourth album Voices through Hot Vessels, which he planned to release after Detox arrived.[59][60]

Planned but unreleased albums during Dr. Dre’s tenure at Aftermath have included a full-length reunion with Snoop Dogg titled Breakup to Makeup, an album with fellow former N.W.A member Ice Cube which was to be titled Heltah Skeltah,[11] an N.W.A reunion album,[11] and a joint album with fellow producer Timbaland titled Chairmen of the Board.[61]

In 2007, Dr. Dre’s third studio album, formerly known as Detox, was slated to be his final studio album.[62] Work for the upcoming album dates back to 2001,[63] where its first version was called “the most advanced rap album ever”, by producer Scott Storch.[64] Later that same year, he decided to stop working on the album to focus on producing for other artists, but then changed his mind; the album had initially been set for a fall 2005 release.[65] Producers confirmed to work on the album include DJ KhalilNottz, Bernard “Focus” Edwards Jr.,[66] Hi-Tek,[67]J.R. Rotem,[68] RZA,[69] Jay-Z,[70] Warren G, and Boi-1da.[71] Snoop Dogg claimed that Detox was finished, according to a June 2008 report by Rolling Stone magazine.[72] After another delay based on producing other artists’ work, Detox was then scheduled for a 2010 release, coming after 50 Cent’s Before I Self Destruct and Eminem’s Relapse, an album for which Dr. Dre handled the bulk of production duties.[73][74] In a Dr Pepper commercial that debuted on May 28, 2009, he premiered the first official snippet of Detox.[75][76] 50 Cent and Eminem asserted in an interview on BET‘s 106 & Park that Dr. Dre had around a dozen songs finished for Detox.[77]

** Source article comes from Wikipedia **

You can view the article in it’s entirety here:
Wiki Article on Dr. Dre

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